Category Archives: Innovation

Future Vision 2025 Assessments: It’s in the Practice

What future are we aiming at? This series of 6 posts, Future Vision 2025, describes some of my personal education mission milestones. These are not predictions, they are aspirational. They are framed as significant differences one could see or make by 2025. What’s noticeably different in 2025 when one examines students, parents, teachers, learning, assessment, media & society? How and when these milestones are reached are not addressed. Some milestones are indicated by the emergence of something ‘new’ (at least at robust scale), others by the fading away of something familiar and comfortable.

Assessment 2025

In the 1970’s, I remember taking the Iowa Test of Basic Skills in math & English, in a few grades, for a few hours.

By 2015 a Council of Great City Schools evaluation showed students undergo standardized testing for 20-25 hours per year, not to mention testing prep time. By the time they graduate, students have been administered about 112 exams. Now, this is great fodder for the program evaluation work I do now, understanding what is working, how much and for whom. It would be impossible at scale without plenty of universal standardized test data. But in the future, given digital content, the 20-25 hours per year of standardized testing can be eliminated while retaining the benefits of the information they used to provide. This reduction of non-learning-added time is in more than just the test hours, it includes eliminating the prep hours for the style of test. And most importantly, this implodes the paradigm that test scores are the purpose, and test day is the culmination, of the school year’s efforts.

By 2025, “sitting tests” in March and April has been replaced by a continual assessment of knowledge and ability throughout the school year, via organic student interaction with the digital learning activities themselves. These activities each week still include practicing solving many problems, aka “doing problem sets.” The information generated from the digital “Practice” IS the new “Assessment.” Indeed summative standardized tests were essentially a review problem set, given in a huge dose at the end of the year. In 2025, each week every student’s use of digital content indicates mastery of that week’s content…or not. Gaps are identified as they occur, and are filled before moving on. You may ask, thinking back to cramming for a final, what about the retention that summative tests checked? In 2025, the digital content and practice adaptively checks retention of key prior knowledge for each individual student, intelligently spiraling problems back and forth to build fluency.

Moreover, beyond the conventional goal of “producing the right answer,” 2025’s digital device interface and pattern recognition assesses student strategy. Tablets collect, and the backend cloud parses and interprets, student handwriting and diagrams. “Show your work” is digitized and thus comprehensively purposeful. The information gleaned evaluates methods and strategies, and yes even productivity and speed. Insightful and actionable feedback on all of these is provided in real-time to the teacher and especially to the student. Why a student “isn’t getting it” becomes detailed and transparent. In 2025 haven’t just replaced “right answer” to “right strategy” though; it’s a different paradigm. Mastery is not tied to one “right” strategy, but it is about learning and applying strategies and methods that are productive – efficiency in thought, effort, and time.

In 2025 comprehensive content breadth and mastery of all techniques, what used to be the summative test’s job, has been measured in this digital, formative way throughout the school year. Indeed because of the continual feedback and intelligent spiraling, it has been not just measured, but refined and improved throughout the year towards fluency. There is still however a “final.” The benefits of a deadline to display one’s complete picture of a complex and broad topic are maintained. But because all that ongoing broad content mastery is already well known, the “final” can focus on a specific “narrow” area of interest. The final can  be a performance – authentic, creative and rigorous and very human which shows off the learner’s ability to communicate, and to creatively transfer to different domains.

Yes, I mean that a middle schooler’s integrated math “final” in 2025 can be a performance, hard to make, challenging to deliver, but fun and maybe even beautiful to watch.

Authentic Performance

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Future Vision 2025 Learning: The Actual Revolution!

What future are we aiming at? This series of 6 posts, Future Vision 2025, describes some of my personal education mission milestones. These are not predictions, they are aspirational. They are framed as significant differences one could see or make by 2025. What’s noticeably different in 2025 when one examines students, parents, teachers, learning, assessment, media & society? How and when these milestones are reached are not addressed. Some milestones are indicated by the emergence of something ‘new’ (at least at robust scale), others by the fading away of something familiar and comfortable.

Learning 2025

The Learning Revolution, it turns out, was about the Learners themselves. It was about their purpose and what they expect while learning. Yes, 21st Century tech was needed to catalyze and scale the Learning Revolution. But the revolution wasn’t about the delivery mechanisms; not about devices or Web X.0. It was about the process of learning not “feeling” the same. A student from 2015, if dropped into a 2025 learning situation,  would likely be far out of their comfort zone.

What’s different for the Learner during the actual learning moments?

Learners expect that what they are learning should make sense to them. They have confidence in their ability to learn material, even if it seems incomprehensible at first. They’ve gained this confidence through personal experience of multiple successful learning breakthroughs, gained through 21st Century learning environments. So, they expect to be able to tell the difference between true, evidence-supported knowledge and unsupported conjecture or false conclusions.

Learning is consciously Learner-directed. Learners understand there are different depths of understanding. Learners decide to what depth they choose to learn any given item or area, based on their own, personal individual purposes. Learner purposes range from immediate problem-resolution, to eager curiosity, to a desire for a professional, life-long “ownership” of the content. Learners understand transferability and seek it: the agility to re-apply any bit of newly gained knowledge or skill to a different, non-routine scenario. Learners crave fluent and precise communication of knowledge. Learners can distinguish in themselves how well or deeply they have learned – and make adjustments, consciously trading off depth and speed.

Yet there is still a familiar, strong, formal educational structure and framework. It’s not just you 1:1 with Wikipedia, Khan, Google, Siri, Alexa, or Cortana. The support structure needed and sought varies with the learner’s desired depth, but it ensures appropriate range, breadth, comprehension, and connectedness. And crucially provides a social mode. “School” is of course still required to lead 5 to 18 year olds to an appropriately broad range and depth of domain literacies.

Learning has gone experiential (learning by doing). In every content area, learners are able to leverage their built-in sensory perception-action cycle. They test hypotheses, sometimes organically, sometimes consciously, via real-time, rigorously accurate feedback. The provision of this multitude of specific, experiential learning environments is where 21st Century tech has been crucial: enabling design of and access to animated simulations and informative feedback. Experiential learning environments provide concrete scenarios first, in every field and at every level. Every learning modality includes as much visually-presented information as publishers can figure out how to provide. Abstract symbolic representations follow in the wake of concrete conceptual grasp.

Learners expect deeper learning to be a lifelong, fun & satisfying, activity. The pleasure of achieving deeper, accurate understanding has become evident to “the masses.”

To many of those still hanging onto positions of power through demagoguery, confusion, lies, distractions, and fear-mongering, this gradual enlightenment of the masses is the ultimate subversive disruption.

Relativity Video

“Visualization of Einstein’s special relativity,” udiprod

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Why Not: 3 Ingredients Enable Universal, Annual Digital Program Evaluations

This post originally appeared in an EdSurge guide, Measuring Efficacy in Ed Tech. Similar content, from a perspective about sharing accountability that teachers alone have shouldered, is in this prior post.

Curriculum-wide programs purchased by districts need to show that they work. Even products aimed mainly at efficiency or access should at minimum show that they can maintain status quo results. Rigorous evaluations have been complex, expensive and time-consuming at the student-level. However, given a digital math or reading program that has reached a scale of 30 or more sites statewide, there is a straightforward yet rigorous evaluation method using public, grade-average proficiencies, which can be applied post-adoption. The method enables not only districts, but also publishers to hold their programs accountable for results, in any year and for any state.

Three ingredients come together to enable this cost-effective evaluation method: annual school grade-average proficiencies in math and reading for each grade posted by each state, a program adopted across all classrooms in each using grade at each school, and digital records of grade average program usage. In my experience, school cohorts of 30 or more sites using a program across a state can be statistically evaluated. Once methods and state posted data are in place, the marginal cost and time per state-level evaluation can be as little as a few man-weeks.

A recently published WestEd study of MIND Research Institute’s ST Math, a supplemental digital math curriculum using visualization (disclosure: I am Chief Strategist for MIND Research) validates and exemplifies this method of evaluating grade-average changes longitudinally, aggregating program usage across 58 districts and 212 schools. In alignment with this methodological validation, in 2014 MIND began evaluating all new implementations of its elementary grade ST Math program in any state with 20 or more implementing grades (from grades 3, 4, and 5).

Clearly, evaluations of every program, every year have not been the prior market norm: it wasn’t possible before annual assessment and school proficiency posting requirements, and wasn’t possible before digital program usage measurements. Moreover, the education market has greatly discounted the possibility that curriculum makes all that much difference to outcomes, to the extent of not even trying to uniformly record what programs are being used by what schools. (Choosing Blindly: Instructional Materials, Teacher Effectiveness, and the Common Core by Matthew Chingos and Russ Whitehurst crisply and logically highlights this “scandalous lack of information” on usage and evaluation of instructional materials, as well as pointing out the high value of improving knowledge in this area.)

But publishers themselves are now in a position, in many cases, to aggregate their own digital program usage records from schools across districts, and generate timely, rigorous, standardized evaluations of their own products, using any state’s posted grade-level assessment data. It may be too early or too risky for many publishers. Currently, even just one rigorous, student-level study can serve as sufficient proof for a product. It’s an unnecessary risk for publishers to seek more universal, annual product accountability. It would be as surprising as if, were the anonymized data available, a fitness company started evaluating and publishing its overall average annual fitness impact on club member cohorts, by usage. By observation of the health club market, this level of accountability is neither a market requirement, nor even dreamed of. No reason for those providers to take on extra accountability.

But while we may accept that member-paid health clubs are not accountable for average health improvements, we need not accept that digital content’s contribution to learning outcomes in public schools goes unaccounted for. And universal content evaluation, enabled for digital programs, can launch a continuous improvement cycle, both for content publishers and for supporting teachers.

Once rigorous program evaluations start becoming commonplace, there will be many findings which lack statistical significance, and even some outright failures. Good to know. We will find that some local district implementation choices, as evidenced by digital usage patterns, turn out to be make-or-break for any given program’s success. Where and when robust teacher and student success is found, and as confidence is built, programs and implementation expertise can also start to be baked into sustained district pedagogical strategies and professional development.

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Future Vision 2025 Teachers: No more “just” a Teacher

What future are we aiming at? This series of 6 posts, Future Vision 2025, describes some of my personal education mission milestones. These are not predictions, they are aspirational. They are framed as significant differences one could see or make by 2025. What’s noticeably different in 2025 when one examines students, parents, teachers, learning, assessment, media & society? How and when these milestones are reached are not addressed. Some milestones are indicated by the emergence of something ‘new’ (at least at robust scale), others by the fading away of something familiar and comfortable.

Teachers 2025

Drumbeats

In 2025, teaching as a profession is gaining respect.

It is gaining respect because the drumbeat from frustration with test scores failure has been stilled. The drumbeat has been stilled by clearly improved performance, both on domestic measures and in international comparisons. Key have been NAEP scores are improving markedly, as well as rising U.S. rankings in the international comparisons of PISA and TIMSS.

The drumbeat has also been stilled by an overall sense of progress and improvement: the educational playing field has been made more level through a smarter policy of enlightened self-interest. For example, government goals to provide quality early childhood education experiences, regardless of any parent’s economic ability to provide them, are by now as prevalent as health and nutritional programs were in 2015.

The beat has been stilled by data showing that the floor of the “achievement gap” is rising dramatically, at scale, across the U.S. Moreover, for the upper edge of the “gap”, all is not flat. Proficient or advanced students are also gaining through deep learning which plumbs far beyond just good scores. All students are growing their talents more than ever before.

Teachers encourage their student’s thirst for deeper learning via dramatically more engaging digital learning environments. The last ten years have, finally, empirically confirmed teachers’ belief that all students can learn challenging material. The experience of teaching practice  itself, with the latest digital tools, organically fills gaps in teachers’ own understanding in real time. And the goals of school itself are more tangibly clear and relevant. In the area of mathematics, for example, teachers understand that the meta-purpose of math education is to provide children with flexible, powerful raw thinking machinery for future general learning and problem-solving.

Teachers as a group are more autonomous than ever, skillfully wielding powerful digital tools to productively engage every learner. Publisher integrated content and tools suites have very obviously matured far beyond what any individual teacher would ever dream of putting together themselves via Google. Teacher job satisfaction is markedly up – because teachers are achieving their own goals for more of their own students: positively influencing lives.

Teacher pre-service training and professional development programs of course assume that teachers will be provided with requisite, powerful digital tools. So this training gives them the expectations and distinctions to recognize which tools are appropriate and effective for which purposes. Freshly-minted teachers are more quickly effective in the classroom. Experienced, creative teachers have more opportunities than ever before to focus on their highest level of value-add, via customization, enrichment, and knowing their individual students, having trading in all their prior low level management of classroom, content, and data.

Teacher-practitioners have earned this newfound level of respect from their students, from parents, from administrators, from the community, and, importantly, feel it deeply within. No more, “I’m just a teacher.”

If you tried to take digital content and tools away from teachers, they would go on strike.

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Future Vision 2025 Parents: the “Same” is no longer good enough

What future are we aiming at? This series of 6 posts, Future Vision 2025, describes some of my personal education mission milestones. These are not predictions, they are aspirational. They are framed as significant differences one could see or make by 2025. What’s noticeably different in 2025 when one examines students, parents, teachers, learning, assessment, media & society? How and when these milestones are reached are not addressed. Some milestones are indicated by the emergence of something ‘new’ (at least at robust scale), others by the fading away of something familiar and comfortable.

Parents 2025

Parents see that 2025’s learning environments for their children are different, and superior, to what they went through as students themselves – just as they expect to see that 2025’s medical options are different and superior to what was available 30 or more years previously.

Parents are noticing positive results for their children, including a background of more general satisfaction with school and learning, and higher confidence in their ability to learn challenging content – presented by teachers with new tools and in new ways.

They are even beginning to expect improvements in schooling. Rather than dig in their heels resisting classroom changes, insisting on schooling “the way I know it worked just fine for me,” parents are starting to believe in progress – because they finally see it working in their own family. They can see and hear their children apply more of their school day “book-learning” to their every day “real world”. Parents notice that for their children, school learning is making more sense, in ways it never did for the parent.

Some parents would even be upset if they found out that their child was receiving ‘only’ the good old familiar and comfortable lecture & practice that the parent remembers from their own schooling. Because they know it can and should be better for their child. Nevertheless, the inertia and familiarity of the same-old same-old keeps it the safe, default choice for education decision-makers.

So, grass roots movements have formed among highly-involved parents of school children to encourage and support teachers through the adoption and quality implementation of proven, though unfamiliar, techniques and tools – in stark contrast to the last many decades of those same highly-involved parents’ rigid adherence to the status quo, based on their conviction that whatever is new could only be degrading learning for their children.

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Digital 1-2-3s Make Math Sense for Preschool Kids

Every parent can see that birth to 5 is a whirlwind of learning. Many parents strive to include informal learning activities like the ABC’s.  But you may be surprised to learn that no aspect of early education is more important to a child’s academic future than mathematicsResearch from Greg Duncan at the University of California, Irvine shows that early math skills in 5 year-olds are the single greatest predictor of later achievement.

So at a recent early childhood education conference in Chicago, I was excited to see policy leaders, researchers, corporations and foundations rallying around the importance of supporting our youngest learners, including in math.  Their vision for accomplishing it … well, I found that less exciting as the only presentation focused on digital content for 4 year olds was my own.

Understandably. The vast majority of digital content “out there” for kids is of low educational quality. I enjoy Sponge-Bob, if not Disney princesses, as much as anyone. But having a 4 year old gesture her way through random edutainment apps is hardly the “transformation” of learning you’ve been hoping for. And yet, digital content is ideal for rapid scale-up, and every year we “wait” for a non-digital solution to reach scale, we miss out on yet another cohort of 4 million more 4 year-olds in the U.S.

So how do you judge digital program quality? First, look for a program that is radically different. Second, look for early, consistent, rigorous results. At the K-5 level, there is a digital, neuroscience-based math program —  MIND Research Institute’s ST Math, that has shown potential for radical transformation of learning. ST Math has successfully doubled and tripled annual growth in math proficiency for Grade 2-5 students on state tests, as it presents math concepts as a full in-school curriculum of visual, language-free puzzles of virtual onscreen manipulatives.

If there exists a proven math program that teaches math visually, without requiring language proficiency or even reading skills, then what better age to apply it to than pre-readers – especially ones who don’t necessarily speak any English! ST Math is currently being piloted in select teacher-led, site-based Pre-K classrooms in Los Angeles. Imagine a teacher working with a 4-year old digital native, who is using a tablet to get literally “hands-on” with number sense.

If we want to level the education playing field before traditional schooling even starts, and lay a solid foundation across the nation for lifelong success in STEM fields, we need to start young and be bold. Digital, unconventional, deeper-learning tools like ST Math may be the transformation you’ve been looking for.

A version of this blog was published in the September issue of District Administration.

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Transforming the Education Market: Look to Non-Profits

This piece was originally published on the Huffington Post on May 3.

The convergence in the last 20 years of advancements in computer, cognitive & neuro-sciences has made game-changing educational programs a possibility. In the area of mathematics education, inventors can now see a path to give teachers powerful yet easy to use, radically different digital tools to get all students to be proficient in math and even algebra. The breakthroughs go beyond math for math’s sake, beyond proficiency on tests, to the fundamental purpose of math education for all students: every person possessing the powerful thinking, analytic and problem-solving skills that mathematical literacy promises. To put a number it, a 2011 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development study estimated that even modestly increased student math skills would add over $40 trillion to the U.S. economy over current students’ lifetimes.

But the K-12 education market is a poster child for unhealthy markets. Products are developed to politicized market specifications, which are far below their potential. Digital solutions from the past 30 years have not worked, so expectations are low. Curriculum is treated as a commodity, and not even evaluated. Not only do most educators not seriously expect teacher tools or content to make a game-changing difference, but K-12 purchasers are looking for approaches familiar to what they experienced in school. The market even lacks understanding of the indicators of program quality and effectiveness necessary to meet the market spec of standardized test success, so simple or secondary features hold sway instead.

In this market, I believe the leaders achieving radically higher educational goals are mission-driven, not-for-profit organizations. Non-profits, almost by definition, need support beyond current market forces. Visionary and savvy business social investments, though relatively small change to $1B businesses, can be and should be vital support for continuous invention and prove-out.

Many business leaders are looking to “help education” through their corporate social responsibility strategies. Unfortunately, based on my experience inside a non-profit education researcher and publisher, what most businesspeople will be looking for is just marginal improvement. There is an unconscious acceptance of the familiar, of “inch deep” learning rather than breakthrough deeper learning. There is a focus on increasing speed and reducing cost. There is a lack of appreciation for the vital role of the teacher.

So, for those visionary businesses and foundations interested in accelerating a quantum leap forward for all teachers and students in K-12 education outcomes (their future workforce/customers), I’d like to suggest that the following considerations are crucial:

1)  Look for non-profits pursuing radically different approaches. Digitizing existing content and approaches is just more of the same, even if ported onto a glossy-screened touch-tablet. People are actually inventing new learning tools, content and processes — like inventing powered flight. Real transformation is going to use teaching and learning models that seem and look and feel radically different from how you learned. Search for that.

2) Look for truly scalable approaches. These three questions will help you evaluate a program’s scalability:

i) Are they applicable to all teachers and students, from gifted to struggling to English learners?

ii) Are they aimed at the heart of the problem right now: at all schools and teachers and training processes as-is? Think Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Houston and D.C. public schools?

Don’t just focus on and invest in the fringes of the school market, which will take years if ever to reach the majority of students in the community, and the nation. Each year, 4 million more children are passing through an untransformed pipeline.

iii) Can they scale up fast and without limit, driven ultimately by non-philanthropic funds? That is, do the economics of the solution enable eventual demand and resources from the main market, i.e. government public schools, to adopt, scale and sustain?

While some non-profits aimed at breakthrough transformation will be in the early stages of research and invention, you can also look for others with solid evidence that their program delivers results, and that there will be market demand and that it is economically scalable.

There are examples of businesses following all of these principles in their social investment in education. Corporate foundations, CEOs and chairs of Cisco, Broadcom, Emulex, Microsemi, PwC, Bank of America, Chevron and others  have come together to support a breakthrough math program using instructional software to tap students’ visual reasoning. You would not recognize math taught this way, it is that different.

The lowest performing elementary schools in Orange County were provided grants to launch this math program. Over 80% of those schools are now participating. A 45,000-student district serving predominantly economically disadvantaged English learners, Santa Ana Unified, went district-wide and closed its “achievement gap” with the California state average. And the targeted schools at a county-wide level are greatly outpacing similar schools in Academic Performance Index growth. The proven results have attracted district funding at over 1,000 additional sites. Over 500,000 students are being served, and scale-up is economical.

For any company interested in helping education, keep an eye out for the pioneering non-profits that fit this profile. Your social investment will then be poised to go beyond “help,” to transform and scale to millions.

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“There’s no achievement gap in videogames” – Quentin Lawson

I don’t want to learn how to play most videogames. By videogames I am thinking involved console games like Call of Duty, or MLB the Show. As a 50-something, that may not be surprising as I’m past the “shoot-em-up” or “race-car” ages (well maybe not real race cars). But truthfully, I would enjoy being able to give my my teenage sons a decent playing partner. The thing is, I know there would be a long and challenging learning curve. Because the learning is discovery/exploratory. And it’s not trivial or short, there is a lot to pick up. For me, it would be both mentally challenging and take significant amounts of time. And I already feel I have enough mental challenge-per-week to sink a battleship. I’m not looking for more. And I can’t afford to have significantly more time, or energy, sucked out of my days.

My point is: learning a console videogame like these is not easy, it takes focus, it takes effort, it takes mental agility, it takes perseverance, it takes time. Sorta like learning anything complex.

And here’s the point of this blog post: it would be ludicrous for anyone to propose that there’s an achievement gap for children to learn videogames. It would also be ludicrous to say that there is an engagement issue – at least for males with the games I mentioned. And it would be beyond incredible to say that kids have a lack of perseverance at solving the game’s problem scenarios.

I attribute this observation to Quentin Lawson, Executive Director of NABSE, the National Alliance of Black School Educators. I was demo’ing for him how all math concepts could be introduced a visual puzzles on a computer, which could be interacted with and animated to understand how to, for example, add fractions. He saw how this was like a videogame and, with young Black male students in mind, noted in an offhand way that “there’s no achievement gap in videogames,” so this could level the playing field. I have been quoting Quentin ever since.

Because how could anyone imagine that success for any child in learning any videogame could depend on:

  • their parents’ education level
  • their parents’ wealth
  • their neighborhood
  • the quality of their friends
  • how much their parents could “tutor” them on the game
  • their own success in school so far
  • the language they speak at home
  • or any other “subgroup” factor

It would be ludicrous; at the least I can’t imagine any such attributes being used by anyone as excuses why children couldn’t win at the game.

So, if productively engaging with challenging core content, like algebra, in a deep and mathematically rigorous way, that requires learner interaction and experiential learning, that starts easy and is gradually scaffolded, that develops problem-solving, perseverance, and confidence in ability to “win”, can be made into a videogame-like experience, then teachers can build-upon, cement and interconnect that mode of learning into deeper understanding and skills, without concern for any digital content achievement gap.

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Instructional Software: Just a Cleanup Activity after Ineffective Teaching??

How instructional software is positioned in the minds of many educators and others is outdated, and misleading.

The conventional model of instructional software (I am thinking “core” subject like mathematics) began, naturally, as a digital extension of conventional teaching. So: practice problems, read onscreen, with multiple choice answers, instant grading and perhaps with some gamification of scores. But if you didn’t “need” the “extra teaching,” you didn’t “need” the instructional software. So it was optional: for some students, some of the time.

There were two logical models for deciding for whom and when to use instructional software: use it for remedial students, or periodic diagnostic tests (eventually also online) for everyone, to determine which skills the student needed more practice in; then assign instructional software just for those specific skills. The metaphor is “filling the holes in the Swiss cheese.”

Implicit in those models was that some students did not need any instructional software: those who learned sufficiently from the standard, no-software-involved, teaching. The instructional software served a role of “cleaning-up” whatever gaps were left unfilled or incomplete after the normal teaching. By observation then,  the regular teaching on its own was ineffective in achieving the learning goal for some students some of the time. (The reason it was ineffective could include many things outside of the teacher’s control, of course.)

Despite the recent emergence of “blended learning” as a desirable future model of combining digital content with teacher & chalkboard learning, at present the preponderance of students still use zero instructional software in their studies. And frequently, even in 2013’s “state-of-the-art” blended learning examples, the role of the digital content is still essentially more practice, like a digitization of homework reps, albeit with intelligent sourcing of problems and with instant scoring.

Similarly, in many 2013 RFP’s the instructional software is specified for RTI tier 2 interventions for struggling students only. This means that not only do the RTI tier 1 “OK” students not need any digital component in the normal course of their learning, it’s not even seen as a way to prevent “OK” students from slipping into tier 2.

All of the above makes sense if you see the role of instructional software as just enabling “more.” More of what teachers ideally, technically “could,” but in the real world can’t, deliver because of the constraints of scarce time, and thus the impossibility of differentiating teaching to productively engage each learner and suit the pace of each learner. So the instructional software provides more time for those students and situations who just didn’t get enough time from conventional teaching.

But consider: more time for students has been tried, and tried, and doesn’t get game-changing results. By game-changing I mean ensuring that every student understands and gains content mastery and confidence in a subject – like math. If more of the same did work for challenging situations, then the mere, but very expensive, application of additional teacher time (double-block, repeated courses, pull-outs) would be shown to “fix” the problem. Which in math, certainly, it doesn’t — not at a scale and cost which can be universal and sustained (i.e. beyond a one-on-one tutorial). So instructional software’s role to give “more of the same” is not a fix.

This pigeon-holing of instructional software as for “clean up” is too limiting. If that’s your model, you wouldn’t even think of buying — or making — instructional software that has fundamental and vital value for every student. Fundamental and vital is how we view… textbooks. Lawsuits are filed and won to ensure that every student has a textbook. When the day comes that a lawsuit is filed, fought and won to ensure that every student has effective instructional software we will know that the pigeon-holing is over.

Here’s an analogy of this positioning problem to the world of exercise and health. It’s as if instructional software is seen as physical therapy, rather than as physical conditioning. It’s as if it’s just for those who are in some way injured, or chronically weak, rather than for everyone who wants to get in shape. You get diagnosed for your injury, perhaps a shoulder tweak, you do your therapy reps with rubber bands, and one happy day you’re healthy enough to quit doing the P.T., forever.

The future, additional role of instructional software is as a vital component of the learning environment, for every student and teacher. It’s like joining and then diligently using a gym’s facilities and moreover its trainers, motivation and social aspects. Properly designed and trained and supported, it’s a gym program that gets everyone more fit. No one gets to “test out”. No one gets to work “just on their weaknesses.”

And it’s not implicit that “ineffective teaching” is the raison d’etre for instructional software. This is turned completely inside-out: instructional software, in the hands of a teacher, makes teaching and learning more powerful and effective generally, throughout the school year: differentiating to reach every student (including the strongest), engaging and motivating each student at an appropriate level and pace, and providing multiple opportunities for the teacher to assess, diagnose, and consolidate student learning.

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Assessments are the Ultimate Game-Changer

“Real change in teaching and learning requires real change in assessment” – Justin Reich.

This arcsparks post is 100% inspired by EdWeek’s Justin Reich’s excellent post “Everything Hinges on Assessment“, which powerfully backs up, and shows examples in support of, his quote above. My post below was also left as a comment on Justin’s blog.

In other words one might say, to profoundly change the game we need to change the scoring. Then, how people play the game to win has to change too.

And the only scoring on K-12 frequent enough, direct, clear, important to all the players, and timely enough to matter to anyone at all is tests, whether in-course or end-of-course.

I”ve been with a non-profit working for 11 years to provide a digital tool for a changed game that very few if any are seriously playing yet.

Specifically math instructional software for blended learning to ensure that students deeply understand math concepts. In the absence of hard-edged assessment, that tests the highest-order conceptual student outcome results we’re spec’ing into our instructional design, we rely on the soft evaluations made by educators on a personal level – i.e. on specific visionary educators, whether at district, site, or class level, seriously insisting on more than is tested for.

Assuming that our program and the educator are actually successful together, this is still an unstable situation, susceptible to specific educators leaving the district/school, etc. to be replaced by another with de facto lower goals for student learning. To put it another way, sustained learning above a floor-level set by the assessments is an unstable exercise in defying gravity.

At my shop, our experience is that a good program will show results on any level of quality assessment of the content, and we are perfectly happy to see results show up (and they do) on fill-in-the-bubble assessments. Nonetheless our strategy is to design for max conceptual understanding, regardless of the assessment.

Quality in instructional materials and programs is extremely expensive – much more expensive than the market thinks it is. Economics alone would dictate designing as cheaply as possible, to the lowest quality required to meet the assessment spec: designed for the test. Fortunately for my shop, we’re a non-profit so our bottom line is learning, not earning and we avoid this temptation.

Bottom line: couldn’t agree more with the points in this post; dramatically raising the assessment’s requirements on student learning will be a profound, irresistable, stable game-changer for educators, students, parents, and all publishers.

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